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Immunisation for children and young people: overview

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Immunisation for children and young people HAI

About

What is covered

This pathway covers recommendations on how to increase immunisation uptake among children and young people aged under 19 in groups and settings where immunisation coverage is low.
It also focuses on improving uptake of the hepatitis B immunisation for babies and young children born to mothers who are chronically infected with the virus, or who have had acute hepatitis B infection during pregnancy.
The recommendations support implementation of the vaccination courses as recommended by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation and indicated in the Green book. They also support timely vaccination according to the recommended scheduleFor details visit the DH website. .
The pathway is for commissioners, managers and professionals working in: the NHS, children's services, local authorities, education and the wider public, private, voluntary and community sectors. It is also for parents of, and those with parental responsibility for, young people aged under 19 and anyone else who is interested in the health and wellbeing of children and young people.

Updates

Updates to this pathway

11 June 2014 Minor maintenance update.
27 January 2014 Minor maintenance update.
2 January 2014 Minor maintenance update.
11 June 2013 Minor maintenance update.
14 December 2012 Minor maintenance update.

Short Text

Reducing differences in the uptake of immunisations (including targeted vaccines) among children and young people aged under 19 years

What is covered

This pathway covers recommendations on how to increase immunisation uptake among children and young people aged under 19 in groups and settings where immunisation coverage is low.
It also focuses on improving uptake of the hepatitis B immunisation for babies and young children born to mothers who are chronically infected with the virus, or who have had acute hepatitis B infection during pregnancy.
The recommendations support implementation of the vaccination courses as recommended by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation and indicated in the Green book. They also support timely vaccination according to the recommended scheduleFor details visit the DH website. .
The pathway is for commissioners, managers and professionals working in: the NHS, children's services, local authorities, education and the wider public, private, voluntary and community sectors. It is also for parents of, and those with parental responsibility for, young people aged under 19 and anyone else who is interested in the health and wellbeing of children and young people.

Sources

The NICE guidance that was used to create the pathway.
Reducing differences in the uptake of immunisations. NICE public health guidance 21 (2009)

Quality standards

Quality statements

Effective interventions library

Effective interventions library

Successful effective interventions library details

Implementation

Commissioning

These resources include support for commissioners to plan for costs and savings of guidance implementation and meeting quality standards where they apply.
These resources will help to inform discussions with providers about the development of services and may include measurement and action planning tools.

Education and learning

NICE produces resources for individual practitioners, teams and those with a role in education to help improve and assess users' knowledge of relevant NICE guidance and its application in practice.

Pathway information

Updates to this pathway

11 June 2014 Minor maintenance update.
27 January 2014 Minor maintenance update.
2 January 2014 Minor maintenance update.
11 June 2013 Minor maintenance update.
14 December 2012 Minor maintenance update.

Supporting information

Glossary

Under the family nurse partnership programme, specially trained nurses visit some of the most vulnerable young mothers and their families at home, working with them from early pregnancy until the child is aged 2 years.
The term 'parent' is used throughout the recommendations to describe anyone with parental responsibility.
A person with parental responsibility may be a parent, step-parent or the parent's civil partner. In the case of looked-after children, this responsibility may have been acquired by another adult or the local authority under the Children Act.
Those with parental responsibility do not necessarily need to be present when a vaccination is given, provided they have received information about it and then arranged for another person (for example, a grandparent or childminder) to attend with the child. For further information see chapter 2 of the Green book.

Paths in this pathway

Pathway created: October 2011 Last updated: June 2014

Copyright © 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All Rights Reserved.

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