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Social and emotional wellbeing for children and young people overview

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Social and emotional wellbeing for children and young people HAI

About

What is covered

This pathway covers recommendations to improve or ensure the social and emotional wellbeing of children and young people. They are for:
Social and emotional wellbeing is important in its own right, but also because it affects physical health and can determine how well children and young people do in their early years and at school.
Good social, emotional and psychological health helps protect against emotional and behavioural problems, violence and crime, teenage pregnancy and the misuse of drugs and alcoholAdi et al. (2007) Systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions to promote mental wellbeing in children in primary education. London: NICE; Colman et al. (2009) Outcomes of conduct problems in adolescence: 40 year follow-up of national cohort. BMJ 338: a2981; Graham and Power (2003) Childhood disadvantage and adult health: a lifecourse framework. London: Health Development Agency. .
Social and emotional wellbeing is influenced by a range of factors, from individual make-up and family background to the community within which people live and society at large.

Vulnerable children aged under 5 years

Knowledge of the complex range of factors that impact on social and emotional development may help encourage investment at a population level in early interventions. This would ensure children (and families) who are most likely to experience the poorest outcomes get the help they need early on in their lives.
Knowledge of these factors, aside, practitioners' experience and expertise will be paramount in assessing the needs and risks of individual children and their families.
The recommendations for vulnerable under-5s and their parents are aimed at all those responsible for ensuring the social and emotional wellbeing of these children. This includes those planning and commissioning children's services in local authorities (including education), the NHS, and the community, voluntary and private sectors.

Children and young people in primary and secondary education

Activities in primary and secondary education can only form one element of a broader, multi-agency strategy to promote and support social and emotional wellbeing.
These recommendations put the emphasis on ensuring children and young people can participate fully in the development of relevant programmes. They are aimed at everyone with public health as part of their remit working in education, local authorities, the NHS and the wider public, independent, voluntary and community sectors.

Updates

Updates to this pathway

3 September 2014 Minor maintenance updates
21 February 2014 Minor maintenance update
2 January 2014 Minor maintenance update.
15 July 2013 The postnatal care quality standard has been added to this pathway.
25 June 2013 Minor maintenance update.
11 June 2013 Minor maintenance update.

National initiatives

The recommendations complement existing national initiatives to promote social and emotional wellbeing within: Healthy lives, healthy people: our strategy for public health in England; No health without mental health; and the schools white paper.
The recommendations for secondary education establishments also help them to meet their statutory responsibilities to promote social and emotional wellbeing and to provide personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education.

Home visiting, early education and childcare

The recommendations on home visiting, early education and childcare for vulnerable children:
  • Adopt a 'life course perspective', recognising that disadvantage before birth and in a child's early years can have life-long, negative effects on their health and wellbeing.
  • Focus on the social and emotional wellbeing of vulnerable children as the foundation for their healthy development and to offset the risks relating to disadvantage. This is in line with the overarching goal of children's services, that is, to ensure all children have the best start in life.
  • Aim to ensure universal services, as well as more targeted services, provide the additional support all vulnerable children need to ensure their mental and physical health and wellbeing. (Key services include maternity, child health, social care, early education and family welfare.)
  • Should be used in conjunction with local child safeguarding policies.
The term 'vulnerable' is used to describe children who are at risk of, or who are already experiencing, social and emotional problems and who need additional support.

Vulnerable children under 5

A number of factors may contribute, to varying degrees, to making a child vulnerable to poor social and emotional wellbeing. In addition, a child's circumstances may vary with time. However, in this pathway vulnerable children include those who are exposed to:
  • parental drug and alcohol problems
  • parental mental health problems
  • family relationship problems, including domestic violence
  • criminality.
They may also include those who:
  • are in a single parent family
  • were born to parents aged under 18 years
  • were born to parents who have a low educational attainment
  • were born to parents who are (or were as children) looked after (that is, they have been in the care system)
  • have physical disabilities
  • have speech, language and communication difficulties.
These indicators can be used to identify groups of children under 5 who are likely to be vulnerable. However, not all of these children will in fact be vulnerable – and others, who do not fall within these groups, could have social and emotional problems.

Short Text

Supporting children and young people's social and emotional wellbeing through home visiting and childcare, and while they are in primary and secondary education.

What is covered

This pathway covers recommendations to improve or ensure the social and emotional wellbeing of children and young people. They are for:
Social and emotional wellbeing is important in its own right, but also because it affects physical health and can determine how well children and young people do in their early years and at school.
Good social, emotional and psychological health helps protect against emotional and behavioural problems, violence and crime, teenage pregnancy and the misuse of drugs and alcoholAdi et al. (2007) Systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions to promote mental wellbeing in children in primary education. London: NICE; Colman et al. (2009) Outcomes of conduct problems in adolescence: 40 year follow-up of national cohort. BMJ 338: a2981; Graham and Power (2003) Childhood disadvantage and adult health: a lifecourse framework. London: Health Development Agency. .
Social and emotional wellbeing is influenced by a range of factors, from individual make-up and family background to the community within which people live and society at large.

Vulnerable children aged under 5 years

Knowledge of the complex range of factors that impact on social and emotional development may help encourage investment at a population level in early interventions. This would ensure children (and families) who are most likely to experience the poorest outcomes get the help they need early on in their lives.
Knowledge of these factors, aside, practitioners' experience and expertise will be paramount in assessing the needs and risks of individual children and their families.
The recommendations for vulnerable under-5s and their parents are aimed at all those responsible for ensuring the social and emotional wellbeing of these children. This includes those planning and commissioning children's services in local authorities (including education), the NHS, and the community, voluntary and private sectors.

Children and young people in primary and secondary education

Activities in primary and secondary education can only form one element of a broader, multi-agency strategy to promote and support social and emotional wellbeing.
These recommendations put the emphasis on ensuring children and young people can participate fully in the development of relevant programmes. They are aimed at everyone with public health as part of their remit working in education, local authorities, the NHS and the wider public, independent, voluntary and community sectors.

Updates

Updates to this pathway

3 September 2014 Minor maintenance updates
21 February 2014 Minor maintenance update
2 January 2014 Minor maintenance update.
15 July 2013 The postnatal care quality standard has been added to this pathway.
25 June 2013 Minor maintenance update.
11 June 2013 Minor maintenance update.

Sources

NICE guidance

The NICE guidance that was used to create the pathway.
Social and emotional wellbeing: early years. NICE public health guidance 40 (2012)
Social and emotional wellbeing in secondary education. NICE public health guidance 20 (2008)
Social and emotional wellbeing in primary education. NICE public health guidance 12 (2008)

Quality standards

Quality statements

Continuity of care

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

The woman and baby's individualised postnatal care plan is reviewed and documented at each postnatal contact.

Rationale

Postnatal care should be a continuation of the care the woman received during her pregnancy, labour and birth. Planning and regularly reviewing the content and timing of care, for individual women and their babies, and communicating this (to the woman, her family and other relevant postnatal care team members) through a documented care plan can improve continuity of care.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that the woman and her baby's individualised postnatal care plan is reviewed and documented at each postnatal contact.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
The proportion of women and their babies who have an individualised and documented postnatal care plan, which is reviewed at each postnatal contact.
Numerator – the number of contacts in which the woman and baby's individualised postnatal care plan is reviewed and documented.
Denominator – the number of postnatal contacts.
Data source: The Maternity Services Secondary Uses Data Set, once implemented, will collect data on the date on which the care plan was created or changed. This covers antenatal, birth and postnatal care plans (global numbers 17201890 and 17201900).
Outcome
Women's satisfaction with the continuity and content of their postnatal care.
Data source: Local data collection. The Care Quality Commission Maternity Services Survey 2010 collected information about women's experiences of maternity care.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that systems are in place to provide women and their babies with an individualised postnatal care plan, which is reviewed and documented at each postnatal contact.
Healthcare practitioners provide women and their babies with an individualised postnatal care plan, which is reviewed and documented at each postnatal contact.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services in which women are provided with an individualised postnatal care plan, which is reviewed and documented at each postnatal contact.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women and their babies have an individualised postnatal care plan, which is reviewed and documented at each postnatal contact.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Postnatal care plan
The individualised postnatal care plan should be documented and developed with the woman, ideally in the antenatal period or as soon as possible after birth. The plan should be comprehensive and include as a minimum:
  • relevant factors from the antenatal, intrapartum and immediate postnatal period
  • details of a named midwife or health visitor, including a 24 hour telephone number to enable the woman to contact her named healthcare practitioner or an alternative practitioner should he or she not be available
  • details of the healthcare practitioners involved in her care and that of her baby, including roles and contact details
  • plans for the postnatal period including:
    • specific plans for managing pregnancy-related conditions when they occur, such as gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, thromboembolism, gestational diabetes, postnatal wound care and mental health conditions
    • details about adjustment to motherhood, emotional wellbeing and family support structures
    • plans for feeding, including specific advice about either breastfeeding support or formula feeding
    • plans for contraceptive care.
(Definition adapted with expert group consensus from NICE clinical guideline 37, recommendation 1.1.3.)
Postnatal contact
Women and their babies should receive the number of postnatal contacts appropriate to their care needs. A postnatal contact is a scheduled postnatal appointment which may occur in the woman or baby's home or another setting such as a GP practice or children's centre. Where a woman remains in hospital following delivery, her postnatal care plan should be reviewed on a daily basis until her transfer home and then reviewed at each subsequent contact.

Equality and diversity considerations

Communication and information-giving between women (and their families) and members of the maternity team is a key aspect of this statement. The individualised postnatal care plan and the information within it should be accessible to women, including women who do not speak or read English and those with additional needs such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities.

Maternal health – life-threatening conditions

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Women are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of conditions that may threaten their lives and require them to access emergency treatment.

Rationale

Women are at increased risk of experiencing serious health events in the immediate hours, days and weeks following the birth, some of which could lead to maternal death or severe morbidity. Providing women with information about the symptoms and signs that may indicate a serious physical illness or mental health condition may prompt them to access immediate emergency treatment if needed. Emergency treatment could potentially avoid unnecessary deaths and severe morbidity.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that women are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of conditions that may threaten her life and require her to access emergency treatment.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
The proportion of women who are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of conditions that may threaten her life and require her to access emergency treatment.
Numerator – the number of women in the denominator who are advised, within the first 24 hours, after birth of the symptoms and signs of conditions that may threaten her life and require her to access emergency treatment.
Denominator – the number of women who have given birth.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
a) Incidence of potentially avoidable maternal morbidity and mortality.
Data source: Local data collection. The Maternity Services Secondary Uses Data Set, once implemented, will collect data on maternal deaths (global number 17207470). The Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths (now undertaken by MBRRACE-UK) reports on rates of maternal death. MBRRACE are expanding their work programme to include severe maternal morbidity.
b) Women feel informed about symptoms and signs of postnatal life-threatening conditions.
Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that systems are in place for women to be advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of conditions that may threaten their lives and require them to access emergency treatment.
Healthcare practitioners advise women, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of conditions that may threaten their lives and require them to access emergency treatment.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services that advise women, within 24 hours of the birth, of conditions that may threaten their lives and require them to access emergency treatment.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life-threatening conditions that should prompt her to call for emergency treatment.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Expert group opinion is that the first postnatal contact should occur within 24 hours after the birth.
Information provision
The woman should receive accurate, evidence-based verbal and written information. If the woman is too unwell to receive this information within the first 24 hours after the birth, the information should be discussed once the woman has made a recovery and is able to identify symptoms and signs of life-threatening conditions in herself. All women should also be provided with a contact number that can be used at any time of the day or night to seek urgent maternity advice (for example, the labour ward triage number).
Symptoms and signs of life-threatening physical conditions
The following symptoms and signs are suggestive of potentially life-threatening physical conditions in the woman:
  • sudden and profuse blood loss or persistent, increased blood loss
  • faintness, dizziness or palpitations or tachycardia
  • fever, shivering, abdominal pain, especially if combined with offensive vaginal loss or a slow-healing perineal wound
  • headaches accompanied by visual disturbances or nausea or vomiting within 72 hours of birth
  • leg pain, associated with redness or swelling
  • shortness of breath or chest pain
  • widespread rash.
(Definition adapted with expert group consensus from NICE clinical guideline 37, recommendation 1.2.1, table 2.)
Symptoms and signs of life-threatening mental health conditions
The following symptoms and signs are suggestive of potentially life-threatening mental health conditions in the woman:
  • severe depression, such as feeling extreme unnecessary worry, being unable to concentrate due to distraction from depressive feelings
  • severe anxiety, such as uncontrollable feeling of panic, being unable to cope or becoming obsessive
  • the desire to hurt others or yourself, including thoughts about taking your own life
  • confused and disturbed thoughts, which could include other people telling you that you are imagining things (hallucinations and delusions).
(Definition adapted with expert group consensus from RCOG's Good practice point 14, section 5.)

Equality and diversity considerations

Communication and information-giving between women (and their families) and members of the maternity team is a key aspect of this statement. Relevant adjustments will need to be in place for anyone who has communication difficulties, and for those who do not speak or read English. Written and verbal information should be appropriate for the woman's level of literacy, culture and language.

Infant health – life-threatening conditions

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Women or main carers of babies are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life-threatening conditions in the baby that require emergency treatment.

Rationale

Babies may experience serious health conditions in the immediate hours, days and weeks following the birth, which can lead to severe illness or in rare cases, death. Providing the mother or main carer with verbal and written information about the symptoms and signs that might indicate their baby has a serious health problem may result in emergency treatment being sought more promptly. This information should be provided within 24 hours of the birth.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that the women or main carers of babies are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life-threatening conditions in the baby that require emergency treatment.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
The proportion of women or main carers of the baby who are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life-threatening conditions in the baby that require emergency treatment.
Numerator – the number of women or main carers of babies who are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life-threatening conditions in the baby that require emergency treatment.
Denominator – the number of mothers or main carers of babies.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
a) Incidence of potentially avoidable infant morbidity and mortality.
Data source: Local data collection. The Maternity Services Secondary Uses Data Set, once implemented, will collect data on neonatal deaths (global number 17209680). The Confidential Enquiries into Perinatal Deaths (now undertaken by MBRRACE-UK) reports on rates of perinatal death. MBRRACE are expanding their work programme to include severe infant morbidity.
b) Women and main carers feel informed about symptoms and signs of potentially life-threatening conditions in the baby.
Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that systems are in place for women or main carers of babies to be advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life threatening conditions in the baby that require emergency treatment.
Healthcare practitioners advise women or main carers of babies, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life-threatening conditions in the baby that require emergency treatment.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services that advise women or main carers of babies, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life threatening conditions in the baby that require emergency treatment.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women or the main carer of the baby are advised, within 24 hours of the birth, of the symptoms and signs of potentially life threatening conditions in the baby that require emergency treatment.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Expert group opinion is that the first postnatal contact should occur within 24 hours after the birth.
Information provision
The woman or main carer of the baby should receive accurate, evidence-based verbal and written information. If the baby is unwell and in hospital, the information should be provided to the mother or main carer prior to the baby's discharge.
The woman or main carer of the baby should also be provided with a contact number that can be used at any time of the day or night to seek urgent advice (for example, the labour ward triage number). The woman or main carer of the baby should be advised to contact the emergency services if they are very concerned about their baby's health.
Symptoms and signs of life-threatening conditions in the baby (0–3 months)
The following symptoms and signs are suggestive of potentially life-threatening physical conditions in the baby (0–3 months):
A major change in the baby's behaviour, for example:
  • less active than usual
  • less responsive than usual
  • more irritable than usual
  • breathing faster than usual or grunting when breathing
  • feeding less than usual
  • nappies much less wet than usual
  • has blue lips
  • is floppy
  • has a fit
  • has a rash that does not fade when pressed with a glass
  • vomits green fluid
  • has blood in their stools
  • has a bulging or very depressed fontanelle
  • has a temperature higher than 38°C
  • with the exception of hands and feet, feels cold when dressed appropriately for the environment temperature
  • within the first 24 hours after the birth:
    • has not passed urine
    • has not passed faeces (meconium)
    • develops a yellow skin colour (jaundice).
(Adapted with expert group consensus from information provided in the Department of Health's Birth to Five book [no longer in print but available for download], NICE clinical guideline 149 and NICE clinical guideline 160.)
Main carer
For the majority of babies the main carer will be the mother. For some babies the main carer could be a close relative, for example the baby's father or grandparent, or for looked-after babies this could be a foster parent.

Equality and diversity considerations

Communication and information-giving between women (and their families) and members of the maternity team is a key aspect of this statement. Relevant adjustments will need to be in place for anyone who has communication difficulties, and for those who do not speak or read English.

Infant health – safer infant sleeping

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Safer infant sleeping is discussed with women, their partner or the main carer at each postnatal contact.

Rationale

There are specific behaviours that increase a baby's risk of sudden infant death syndrome. Providing the woman, her partner or the main carer with the opportunity to regularly discuss infant sleeping practices can help to identify and support them and the wider family to establish safer infant sleeping habits, and to reduce the baby's risk of sudden infant death syndrome.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that information about safer infant sleeping is discussed with women, their partner or the main carer at each postnatal contact.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
a) Proportion of women, their partners or main carers of newborn babies who have a discussion about safer infant sleeping within 24 hours of the birth.
Numerator – the number of women, their partners or main carers of newborn babies who have a discussion about safer infant sleeping within 24 hours of the birth.
Denominator – the number of newborn babies.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Proportion of women, their partners or main carers of newborn babies who have a discussion about safer infant sleeping at every postnatal contact.
Numerator – the number of postnatal contacts in which women, their partners or main carers of newborn babies have a discussion about safer infant sleeping.
Denominator – the number of postnatal contacts.
Data source: Local data collection.
c) Proportion of women, their partners or main carers of newborn babies who have a discussion about safer infant sleeping at a postnatal contact 10–14 days after the birth (at the midwifery and health visitor handover when the woman and baby are discharged from the care of the community midwifery team to the care of the health visitor).
Numerator – the number of women, their partners or main carers of newborn babies who have a discussion about safer infant sleeping at a postnatal contact 10–14 days after the birth.
Denominator – the number of newborn babies.
Data source: Local data collection.
d) Proportion of women, their partners or main carers of newborn babies who have a discussion about safer infant sleeping at the 6–8 week postnatal check.
Numerator – the number of women, their partners or main carers of newborn babies who have a discussion about safer infant sleeping at the 6–8 week postnatal check.
Denominator – the number of newborn babies.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
a) Incidence of sudden infant death syndrome.
Data source: Office for National Statistics report Unexplained deaths in infancy – England and Wales, 2010.
b) Women's and main carers' knowledge about safer infant sleeping.
Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that systems are in place for women, their partner or the main carer of the baby to have a discussion about safer infant sleeping at every postnatal contact.
Healthcare practitioners ensure that safer infant sleeping is discussed with the woman, her partner or the main carer at every postnatal contact.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services that provide the woman, her partner or the main carer of the baby with the opportunity to discuss safer infant sleeping at every postnatal contact.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women, their partner or the main carer are given the opportunity to discuss safer infant sleeping at every postnatal contact.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Information provision
The woman, her partner or main carer of the baby should receive accurate, evidence-based verbal and written information about safer infant sleeping. This written information should be discussed with the woman, her partner or main carer within 24 hours of the birth, and safer infant sleeping discussed at each subsequent postnatal contact (including 10–14 days after the birth and at the 6–8 week postnatal check).
Main carer
For the majority of babies the main carer will be the mother. For some babies the main carer could be a close relative, for example the baby's father or grandparent, or for looked-after babies this could be a foster parent.
Postnatal contact
Women and their babies should receive the number of postnatal contacts appropriate to their care needs. A postnatal contact is a scheduled postnatal appointment that may occur in the woman or baby's home, a GP practice or children's centre, or a hospital setting if the woman or baby needs extended inpatient care. For the majority of women, babies and families the postnatal period ends 6–8 weeks after the birth.

Equality and diversity considerations

Communication and information-giving between women (and their families) and members of the maternity team is a key aspect of this statement. Relevant adjustments will need to be in place for anyone who has communication difficulties, and for those who do not speak or read English. Verbal and written information should be appropriate in terms of the women's (and their families) level of literacy, culture, language and family circumstances.

Breastfeeding

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Women receive breastfeeding support from a service that uses an evaluated, structured programme.

Rationale

Breastfeeding contributes to the health of both the mother and child in the short and longer term. Women should be made aware of these benefits and those who choose to breastfeed should be supported by a service that is evidence-based and delivers an externally audited, structured programme. Delivery of breastfeeding support should be coordinated across the different sectors.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements for breastfeeding support to be provided through a service that uses an evaluated, structured programme.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
a) Proportion of women who receive breastfeeding support through a service that uses an evaluated, structured programme.
Numerator – the number of women in the denominator who receive breastfeeding support through a service that uses an evaluated, structured programme.
Denominator – the number of women who breastfeed (exclusively or partially).
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Proportion of women who wanted to continue breastfeeding but stopped before they had planned to.
Numerator – the number of women who wanted to continue breastfeeding but stopped before they had planned to.
Denominator – the number of women who breastfed (exclusively or partially).
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
a) Rates of breastfeeding initiation.
Data source: The Maternity Services Secondary Uses Data Set, once implemented, will collect data on 'baby first feed breast milk status' (global number 17205882), 'baby breast milk status (at discharge from hospital)' including exclusive and partial breast milk feeding (global number 17207550). The Infant Feeding Survey 2010 collected self-report data on the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding in the first 8–10 months after the baby was born.
b) Rates of exclusive or partial breastfeeding on discharge from hospital and at 5–7 days, 10–15 days, 6–8 weeks and 16 weeks after the birth.
Data source: The Maternity Services Secondary Uses Data Set, once implemented, will collect data on 'baby first feed breast milk status' (global number 17205882), 'baby breast milk status (at discharge from hospital)', including exclusive and partial breast milk feeding (global number 17207550). The Children and Young People's Health Services Secondary Uses Data Set, once implemented, will collect data on 'breastfeeding status' (global number 17101340), including 'Exclusively Breast Milk Feeding', 'Partially Breast Milk Feeding' and 'No Breast Milk Feeding at all', and also data on observation date (breastfeeding status) (global number 17104440). The Infant Feeding Survey 2010 collected self-report data on the prevalence and duration of breastfeeding in the first 8–10 months after the baby was born.
c) Women's satisfaction with breastfeeding support.
Data source: The Care Quality Commission Maternity Services Survey 2010 collected information about women's experiences of maternity care and this included a section on 'Feeding your baby'.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that women receive breastfeeding support through a service that uses an evaluated, structured programme.
Healthcare practitioners ensure that women receive breastfeeding support through an integrated service that uses an evaluated, structured programme.
Commissioners ensure that they commission a service that delivers breastfeeding support through an evaluated, structured programme.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women receive breastfeeding support through a service that uses an evaluated, structured programme.

Source guidance

  • NICE clinical guideline 37 recommendation 1.3.3 (key priority for implementation)
  • NICE public health guidance 11 recommendations 1 (key priority for implementation) and 7 (key priority for implementation).

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Structured programme
NICE clinical guideline 37 recommends that all maternity care providers (whether working in hospital or in primary care) should implement an externally evaluated, structured programme that encourages breastfeeding, using the Baby Friendly Initiative as a minimum standard. If providers implement a locally developed programme, this should be evidence-based, structured, and undergo external evaluation. The structured programme should be delivered and coordinated across all providers, including hospital, primary, community and children's centre settings. Breastfeeding outcomes should be monitored across all services.
Breastfeeding support
All people involved in delivering breastfeeding support should receive the appropriate training and undergo assessment of competencies for their role. This includes employed staff and volunteer workers in all sectors, for example, hospitals, community settings, children's centres and peer supporter services.

Equality and diversity considerations

Breastfeeding support should be culturally appropriate and accessible to people with additional needs, such as physical, sensory or learning disabilities, and to people who do not speak or read English. Women should have access to an interpreter or advocate if needed. Special consideration will be needed if the mother and baby have been separated for any reason, for example if the baby has been admitted to neonatal care or the baby has been taken into care.

Formula feeding

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Information about bottle feeding is discussed with women or main carers of formula-fed babies.

Rationale

Babies who are fully or partially formula fed can develop infections and illnesses if their formula milk is not prepared safely. In a small number of babies these cause serious harm and are life threatening, and require the baby to be admitted to hospital. The mother or main carer of the baby needs consistent, evidence-based advice about how to sterilise feeding equipment and safely prepare formula milk.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that information about bottle feeding is discussed with women or main carers of formula-fed babies.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
The proportion of women or main carers of formula-fed babies who have information about bottle feeding discussed with them.
Numerator – the number of women or main carers in the denominator who have information about bottle feeding discussed with them.
Denominator – the number of women or main carers of formula-fed babies.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
a) Rates of hospital admissions for formula feeding-related conditions.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Women's and main carers' knowledge of how to sterilise feeding equipment and safely prepare formula milk.
Data source: The Infant Feeding Survey 2010 collected self-report data on how mothers prepared powdered formula feed in the last 7 days, including whether they had followed all 3 recommendations for making up feeds (only making 1 feed at a time; making feeds within 30 minutes of the water boiling; and adding the water to the bottle before the powder).
c) Women's and main carers' satisfaction with feeding support.
Data source: The Care Quality Commission Maternity Services Survey 2010 collected information about women's experiences of maternity care and this included a section on 'Feeding your baby'.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that information about bottle feeding is discussed with women or main carers of formula-fed babies.
Healthcare practitioners discuss information about bottle feeding with women or main carers of formula-fed babies.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services in which information about bottle feeding is discussed with women or main carers of formula-fed babies.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women or main carers of formula-fed babies have the opportunity to discuss information about bottle feeding.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Formula-fed baby
This statement relates to mothers and main carers who totally or partially formula feed their baby, and breastfeeding mothers who plan to formula feed their baby.
Information provision
The woman or main carer of the baby should receive accurate, evidence-based information that includes written information about formula feeding.
To ensure the mother or main carer has a good understanding of how to prepare formula feeds, it may be appropriate to give a demonstration as well as discussing bottle feeding.
Main carer
For the majority of babies the main carer will be the mother. For some babies the main carer could be a close relative, for example the baby's father or grandparent, or for looked-after babies this could be a foster parent.

Equality and diversity considerations

Communication and information-giving between women (and their families) and members of the maternity team is a key aspect of this statement. Relevant adjustments will need to be in place for anyone who has communication difficulties, and for those who don't speak or read English. Verbal and written information should be appropriate in terms of women's (and their families) level of literacy, culture, language and family circumstances.

Infant health – physical examination

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Babies have a complete 6–8 week physical examination.

Rationale

The purpose of the examination is to identify babies more likely to have conditions that would benefit from further investigation and management. This includes an overall physical examination as well as screening for eye problems, congenital heart defects, developmental dysplasia of the hip and undescended testicles. Most babies will be healthy, but the small number of babies who do have serious problems will benefit from prompt identification. Early treatment can improve the health of the baby and prevent or reduce disability.

Quality measures

Structure
a) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that parents or main carers of babies are offered an appointment for the baby to attend for their 6–8 week physical examination before 10 weeks of age.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that a system is in place to monitor the competency of practitioners undertaking the 6–8 week physical examination.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
Proportion of babies who have undergone a 6–8 week physical examination.
Numerator – the number of babies in the denominator who have undergone a 6–8 week physical examination.
Denominator – the number of babies aged 10 weeks.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcomes
a) Incidence of physical abnormalities in babies.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Health outcomes associated with early intervention for babies with physical abnormalities.
Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that babies are offered a complete 6–8 week physical examination.
Healthcare practitioners ensure that they perform a complete 6–8 week physical examination of babies and that they maintain the necessary competencies for this role.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services that offer a complete 6–8 week physical examination for babies, which is carried out in timely manner and by a competent practitioner.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

The mother or main carer of the baby is given the opportunity for their baby to have a complete 6–8 week physical examination, which is carried out in timely manner and by a competent practitioner.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

NICE clinical guideline 37 recommendation 1.4.11, 1.4.13 and the Newborn and Infant Physical Examination Standards and Competencies (March 2008) detail the components of the 6–8 week physical examination.
Note on measures
The National Screening Committee recommend that where possible, the baby's 6–8 week physical examination should be combined with the baby's first set of vaccinations to provide a 'one stop service'. However, as the baby's vaccinations should only exceptionally be scheduled before the age of 8 weeks, the 6–8 week examination is usually undertaken when the baby is at least 8 weeks of age. Therefore, for pragmatic reasons the examination should take place before 10 completed weeks of age, that is before 77 days.

Maternal health – weight management

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Women with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m2 or more at the 6–8 week postnatal check are offered a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.

Rationale

The woman's eating habits and physical activity levels could influence the health behaviour of the wider family, including children who are developing habits that may remain with them for life. Supporting the woman in the postnatal period to change her eating habits and physical activity levels may improve her health, her infant's health and the health of the wider family. It may also improve the outcomes of future pregnancies.
Women who are obese during pregnancy face increased risks of complications that include gestational diabetes, miscarriage, pre eclampsia, thromboembolism and maternal death. Risks for the infant include fetal death, stillbirth, shoulder dystocia, and macrosomia. Infants of obese women face health risks in childhood including diabetes and obesity in later life.

Quality measures

Structure
a) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that women have their BMI assessed and recorded at the 6–8 week postnatal check.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more at the 6–8 week postnatal check are offered a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.
Data source: Local data collection.
c) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that the local workforce has appropriate numbers of staff trained to deliver healthy eating and physical activity services to postnatal women.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
a) The proportion of women who have their BMI recorded at the 6–8 week postnatal check.
Numerator – the number of women in the denominator who have their BMI recorded.
Denominator – the number of women who attend a 6–8 week postnatal check.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) The proportion of women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more at the 6–8 week postnatal check who are offered a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.
Numerator – the number of women in the denominator who are offered a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.
Denominator – the number of women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more who attend a 6–8 week postnatal check.
Data source: Local data collection.
c) The proportion of women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more at the 6–8 week postnatal check who accept a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.
Numerator – the number of women in the denominator who accept a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.
Denominator – the number of women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more who attend a 6–8 week postnatal check.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
Women feel able to make informed decisions about healthy eating, physical activity and weight management for themselves and their family.
Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that systems are in place for women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more at the 6–8 week postnatal check to be offered a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.
Healthcare practitioners offer women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more at the 6–8 week postnatal check a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services that offer women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more at the 6–8 week postnatal check a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women who have a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or more at the 6–8 week postnatal check are offered a referral for advice on healthy eating and physical activity.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Structured programme
Women should be offered a referral to an individual or group-based service that uses a structured programme. NICE public health guidance 11 recommendation 6 states that services should deliver a structured programme that:
  • addresses the reasons why women may find it difficult to lose weight, particularly after pregnancy
  • is tailored to the needs of an individual or group
  • combines advice on healthy eating and physical exercise (advising them to take a brisk walk or other moderate exercise for at least 30 minutes on at least 5 days of the week)
  • identifies and addresses individual barriers to change
  • provides ongoing support over a sufficient period of time to allow for sustained lifestyle changes.
Services should be delivered by an appropriately trained person. This is someone who can demonstrate expertise and competencies in healthy eating and/or physical activity, including weight management for women in the postnatal period. This may include midwives, health visitors, obstetricians, dietitians, GPs, nurses, midwifery assistants, support workers and those working in weight management programmes (commercial or voluntary).
(Adapted with expert group consensus from NICE public health guidance 27, recommendations 3 and 4).
Women who choose not to accept a referral should be given information about where they can get support on healthy eating and physical activity in future.

Equality and diversity considerations

Women should be able to access services that are appropriate to their cultural and religious beliefs, and that make relevant adjustments for anyone who has communication difficulties, and for those who don't speak or read English.

Emotional wellbeing and infant attachment

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Women have their emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, assessed at each postnatal contact.

Rationale

The baby's relationship with the mother (or main carer) has a significant impact on the baby's social and emotional development. In turn, the woman's ability to provide a nurturing relationship is partly dependent on her own emotional wellbeing. Regular assessment of the woman's emotional wellbeing and the impact of this on her attachment to her baby may lead to earlier detection of problems.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements that women have their emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, assessed at each postnatal contact.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
a) Proportion of women whose emotional wellbeing, including emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at each postnatal contact.
Numerator – the number of postnatal contacts in the denominator in which the mother's emotional wellbeing, including emotional attachment to the baby, is assessed.
Denominator – the number of postnatal care contacts.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Proportion of women whose emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at a postnatal contact 5–7 days after the birth.
Numerator – the number of women whose emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at a postnatal contact 5–7 days after the birth.
Denominator – the number of women receiving a postnatal contact 5–7 days after the birth.
Data source: Local data collection.
c) Proportion of women whose emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at a postnatal contact 10–14 days after the birth (at the midwifery and health visitor handover when the woman and baby are discharged from the care of the community midwifery team to the care of the health visitor).
Numerator – the number of women whose emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at a postnatal contact 10–14 days after the birth.
Denominator – the number of women receiving a postnatal contact 10–14 days after the birth.
Data source: Local data collection.
d) Proportion of women whose emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at a postnatal contact 6–8 weeks after the birth.
Numerator – the number of women whose emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at a postnatal contact 6–8 weeks after the birth.
Denominator – the number of women receiving a postnatal contact 6–8 weeks after the birth.
Data source: Local data collection.
e) Proportion of women whose emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at a postnatal contact 16 weeks after the birth.
Numerator – the number of women whose emotional wellbeing, including their emotional attachment to their baby, is assessed at a postnatal contact 16 weeks after the birth.
Denominator – the number of women receiving a postnatal contact 16 weeks after the birth.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
a) Incidence of postnatal mental health problems.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Incidence of mother-to-baby emotional attachment problems.
Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that systems are in place so that women are asked about their emotional wellbeing, including their mother-to-baby emotional attachment, assessed at each postnatal contact.
Healthcare practitioners ensure that women have their emotional wellbeing, including their mother-to-baby emotional attachment, assessed at each postnatal contact.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services that have local agreements to ensure women have their emotional wellbeing, including their mother-to-baby emotional attachment, assessed at each postnatal contact.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women have their emotional wellbeing, including their relationship with their baby (called 'emotional attachment'), assessed at each postnatal contact.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Postnatal contacts
Women and their babies should receive the number of postnatal contacts that are appropriate to their care needs. A postnatal contact is a scheduled postnatal appointment that may occur in the woman or baby's home or another setting such as a GP practice, children's centre or this could be a hospital setting where women and/or the baby requires extended inpatient care.
Emotional wellbeing
NICE public health guidance 40 defines emotional wellbeing as 'being happy and confident and not anxious or depressed'.
Mother-to-baby emotional attachment
This involves the formation of a secure bond between the mother and the baby, in which the mother responds sensitively and appropriately to the baby's signals, providing an environment in which the baby feels secure.

Equality and diversity considerations

Communication between women (and their families) and members of the maternity team is a key aspect of this statement. Relevant adjustments will need to be in place for anyone who has communication difficulties, and for those who don't speak or read English.

Maternal health – mental wellbeing

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Women who have transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues') that have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth should be assessed for mental health problems.

Rationale

Women experience emotional changes in the immediate postnatal period which usually resolve within 10–14 days after the birth. Women who are still feeling low in mood, anxious, experiencing negative thoughts or lacking interest in their baby at 10–14 days after the birth may be at increased risk of mental health problems. These women should receive an assessment of their mental wellbeing.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements for women in whom transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues') have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth to have an assessment for mental health problems.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
Proportion of women in whom transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues') have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth who are assessed for mental health problems.
Numerator – the number of women in whom transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues') have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth who are assessed for mental health problems.
Denominator – the number of women in whom transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues') have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
Incidence of postnatal mental health problems.
Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that systems are in place for women in whom transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues') have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth to have an assessment for mental health problems.
Healthcare practitioners ensure that women in whom transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues') have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth are assessed for mental health problems.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services with local arrangements for women in whom transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues') have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth to have an assessment for mental health problems.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Women in whom 'baby blues' have not resolved at 10–14 days after the birth are assessed for mental health problems.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Transient psychological symptoms ('baby blues')
NICE clinical guideline 37 recommendation 1.2.25 provides 'tearfulness, feelings of anxiety and low mood' as examples of the symptoms and signs of unresolved transient psychological symptoms.
Assessment for mental health problems
For women who have a possible mental health issue, NICE clinical guideline 45 recommends that healthcare practitioners may consider the use of self-report measures such as the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) or Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) as part of a subsequent assessment process.

Equality and diversity considerations

Communication between women (and their families) and members of the maternity team is a key aspect of this statement. Relevant adjustments will need to be in place for anyone who has communication difficulties, and for those who don't speak or read English.

Parent–baby attachment

This quality statement is taken from the postnatal care quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for postnatal care and should be read in full.

Quality statement

Parents or main carers who have infant attachment problems receive services designed to improve their relationship with their baby.

Rationale

Problems with parent-to-baby attachment may result in the baby developing emotional, psychological or behavioural issues in childhood. Providing family-based interventions could improve attachment, thereby providing the building blocks for the child to develop healthy behaviours and mental wellbeing.

Quality measures

Structure
Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that parents or main carers with infant attachment problems receive services designed to improve their relationship with their baby.
Data source: Local data collection.
Process
Proportion of parents or main carers with infant attachment problems who receive services designed to improve their relationship with their baby.
Numerator – the number of parents or main carers with infant attachment problems who receive services designed to improve their relationship with their baby.
Denominator – the number of parents or main carers with infant attachment problems.
Data source: Local data collection.
Outcome
a) Emotional, behavioural and social wellbeing of developing babies.
Data source: Local data collection.
b) Parental or main carer satisfaction with services to support parenting skills.
Data source: Local data collection.

What the quality statement means for service providers, health and social care practitioners, and commissioners

Service providers ensure that parents or main carers with infant attachment problems receive services designed to improve their relationship with their baby.
Healthcare practitioners offer parents or main carers with infant attachment problems services designed to improve their relationship with their baby.
Commissioners ensure that they commission services that have systems in place to offer parents or main carers with infant attachment problems services designed to improve their relationship with their baby.

What the quality statement means for patients, service users and carers

Parents or main carers who are having difficulties forming a bond with their child are able to receive services designed to improve their relationship with their baby.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Services to improve parent-baby relationships
Services have the aim of promoting emotional attachment and improving parenting skills. Services should be tailored to the needs of the family and baby and may include the woman, partner and wider family. Services should be sensitive to a wide range of attitudes, expectations and approaches in relation to parenting. NICE public health guidance 40 provides guidance about the types of services which may provide additional parenting support, for example a series of intensive home visits delivered by an appropriately trained nurse, baby massage and video interaction.
Main carer
For the majority of babies the main carer will be the mother. For some babies the main carer could be a close relative, for example the baby's father or grandparent, or for looked-after babies this could be a foster parent.

Equality and diversity considerations

In order to promote equality, the parents of babies who are vulnerable to poor parent-baby relationships may require additional intensive support. Services should take into account the parent's first language, and this may influence the interventions to achieve specified goals around the baby's communication, speech and language development.

Effective interventions library

Effective interventions library

Successful effective interventions library details

Implementation

Commissioning

These resources include support for commissioners to plan for costs and savings of guidance implementation and meeting quality standards where they apply.
These resources will help to inform discussions with providers about the development of services and may include measurement and action planning tools.

Education and learning

NICE produces resources for individual practitioners, teams and those with a role in education to help improve and assess users' knowledge of relevant NICE guidance and its application in practice.

Service improvement and audit

These resources provide help with planning ahead for NICE guidance, understanding where you are now, and conducting improvement initiatives.

Pathway information

National initiatives

The recommendations complement existing national initiatives to promote social and emotional wellbeing within: Healthy lives, healthy people: our strategy for public health in England; No health without mental health; and the schools white paper.
The recommendations for secondary education establishments also help them to meet their statutory responsibilities to promote social and emotional wellbeing and to provide personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education.

Home visiting, early education and childcare

The recommendations on home visiting, early education and childcare for vulnerable children:
  • Adopt a 'life course perspective', recognising that disadvantage before birth and in a child's early years can have life-long, negative effects on their health and wellbeing.
  • Focus on the social and emotional wellbeing of vulnerable children as the foundation for their healthy development and to offset the risks relating to disadvantage. This is in line with the overarching goal of children's services, that is, to ensure all children have the best start in life.
  • Aim to ensure universal services, as well as more targeted services, provide the additional support all vulnerable children need to ensure their mental and physical health and wellbeing. (Key services include maternity, child health, social care, early education and family welfare.)
  • Should be used in conjunction with local child safeguarding policies.
The term 'vulnerable' is used to describe children who are at risk of, or who are already experiencing, social and emotional problems and who need additional support.

Vulnerable children under 5

A number of factors may contribute, to varying degrees, to making a child vulnerable to poor social and emotional wellbeing. In addition, a child's circumstances may vary with time. However, in this pathway vulnerable children include those who are exposed to:
  • parental drug and alcohol problems
  • parental mental health problems
  • family relationship problems, including domestic violence
  • criminality.
They may also include those who:
  • are in a single parent family
  • were born to parents aged under 18 years
  • were born to parents who have a low educational attainment
  • were born to parents who are (or were as children) looked after (that is, they have been in the care system)
  • have physical disabilities
  • have speech, language and communication difficulties.
These indicators can be used to identify groups of children under 5 who are likely to be vulnerable. However, not all of these children will in fact be vulnerable – and others, who do not fall within these groups, could have social and emotional problems.

Supporting information

A definition of social and emotional wellbeing

Social and emotional wellbeing provides the building block for healthy behaviours and educational attainment. It also helps prevent behavioural problems (including substance misuse) and mental illness. For the purposes of this pathway, the following definitions are used:
  • emotional wellbeing – this includes being happy and confident and not anxious or depressed
  • psychological wellbeing – this includes the ability to be autonomous, problem-solve, manage emotions, experience empathy, be resilient and attentive
  • social wellbeing – has good relationships with others and does not have behavioural problems, that is, they are not disruptive, violent or a bully.

Glossary

Children who are exposed to difficult situations such as bullying or racism, or who are coping with socially disadvantaged circumstances, are at higher risk of anxiety, emotional distress and behavioural problems. They may include: looked-after children (including those who have subsequently been adopted), those living in families where there is conflict or instability, those who persistently refuse to go to school, those who have experienced adverse life events (such as bereavement or parental separation), and those who have been exposed to abuse or violence.
Baby massage techniques are interventions to promote infant massage. Benefits are reported to include improvements in parent and/or child sleep patterns, their interaction and relationship.
Safeguarding policies and activities aim to ensure children receive safe and effective care, are protected from maltreatment and have their health and development needs met. Legislation and related policies describe how individuals and agencies should work together to safeguard children.
The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is the UK name for the US-developed Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP). The partnership provides an intensive, structured home-visiting programme for young, first-time mothers from a disadvantaged background and their partners. The emphasis is on building a strong relationship between a specially trained (family) nurse and the parents. Support is available from early pregnancy until the child is aged 2 years. The aim is to improve pregnancy outcomes, the child's health and development and the parents' economic self-sufficiency.
A joint strategic needs assessment (JSNA) provides a profile of the health and social care needs of a local population. JSNAs are used as the basis for developing joint health and wellbeing strategies.
Organisation-wide approaches in secondary education help all young people to develop social and emotional skills, as well as providing specific help for those most at risk (or already showing signs) of problems.
For the purposes of this pathway, social and emotional wellbeing encompasses:
  • happiness, confidence and not feeling depressed (emotional wellbeing)
  • a feeling of autonomy and control over one's life, problem-solving skills, resilience, attentiveness and a sense of involvement with others (psychological wellbeing)
  • the ability to have good relationships with others and to avoid disruptive behaviour, delinquency, violence or bullying (social wellbeing).
Organisation-wide approaches in secondary education help all young people to develop social and emotional skills, as well as providing specific help for those most at risk (or already showing signs) of problems.
For the purposes of this pathway, social and emotional wellbeing encompasses:
  • happiness, confidence and not feeling depressed (emotional wellbeing)
  • a feeling of autonomy and control over one's life, problem-solving skills, resilience, attentiveness and a sense of involvement with others (psychological wellbeing)
  • the ability to have good relationships with others and to avoid disruptive behaviour, delinquency, violence or bullying (social wellbeing).
In the context of this guidance, 'readiness for school' refers to a child's cognitive, social and emotional development. Development during the child's early years may be achieved through interaction with their parents or through the processes of play and learning.
Secondary education refers to all education establishments for young people aged 11–19 years including further education colleges, technology colleges, academies and private sector establishments.
Social and emotional wellbeing provides the building block for healthy behaviours and educational attainment. It also helps prevent behavioural problems (including substance misuse) and mental illness. For the purposes of this pathway, the following definitions are used:
  • emotional wellbeing – this includes being happy and confident and not anxious or depressed
  • psychological wellbeing – this includes the ability to be autonomous, problem-solve, manage emotions, experience empathy, be resilient and attentive
  • social wellbeing – has good relationships with others and does not have behavioural problems, that is, they are not disruptive, violent or a bully.
A targeted service may be distinct from, or an adaptation of, a universal service. For example, a tailored home visiting programme by a nurse, midwife or health visitor may be provided for young parents from a disadvantaged background. This would be separate from the universal home visiting service provided for all new families and might, for example, include longer sessions, goal setting and a range of specific interventions.
Primary care services including those offered by GPs, paediatricians, health visitors, school nurses, social workers, teachers, juvenile justice workers, voluntary agencies and social services.
Child and adolescent mental health services relating to workers in primary care. It includes: clinical child psychologists, paediatricians with specialist training in mental health, educational psychologists, child and adolescent psychiatrists, child and adolescent psychotherapists, counsellors, community nurses/nurse specialists and family therapists.
Universal approaches are curriculum-based programmes and other activities aimed at developing the social and emotional competence of all students.
Universal interventions are curriculum-based programmes and other activities aimed at developing the social and emotional competence of all students.
Universal services, such as general education and healthcare services, are available to everyone. For all children aged up to 5 years, universal provision includes: maternal healthcare, midwife home visits soon after birth and routine health visitor checks..
Interactions between a parent or carer and a child are recorded using audio visual equipment. This is later viewed and discussed, typically with a health or social care professional. Parents and carers are given a chance to reflect on their behaviour, with the focus on elements that are successful. The aim is to improve their communications and relationship with their child.
A number of factors may contribute, to varying degrees, to making a child aged under 5 vulnerable to poor social and emotional wellbeing. In addition, a child's circumstances may vary with time. However, in this pathway vulnerable children include those who are exposed to:
  • parental drug and alcohol problems
  • parental mental health problems
  • family relationship problems, including domestic violence
  • criminality.
They may also include those who:
  • are in a single parent family
  • were born to parents aged under 18 years
  • were born to parents who have a low educational attainment
  • were born to parents who are (or were as children) looked after (that is, they have been in the care system)
  • have physical disabilities
  • have speech, language and communication difficulties.
These indicators can be used to identify groups of children under 5 who are likely to be vulnerable. However, not all of these children will in fact be vulnerable – and others, who do not fall within these groups, could have social and emotional problems.
The term whole-school is commonly used to refer to organisation-wide approaches in schools.

Paths in this pathway

Pathway created: December 2011 Last updated: September 2014

© NICE 2014

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