A-Z
Topics
Latest

Babies, children and young people’s experience of healthcare

About

What is covered

This pathway covers patient experience for babies, children and young people aged 17 or under who need physical or mental healthcare including how:
  • to make that experience as positive as possible
  • they can be involved in continuously improving that experience.

Updates

Person-centred care

People have the right to be involved in discussions and make informed decisions about their care, as described in your care.
Making decisions using NICE guidelines explains how we use words to show the strength (or certainty) of our recommendations, and has information about prescribing medicines (including off label use), professional guidelines, standards and laws (including on consent and mental capacity), and safeguarding.

Your responsibility

Guidelines

The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, professionals and practitioners are expected to take this guideline fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients or the people using their service. It is not mandatory to apply the recommendations, and the guideline does not override the responsibility to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual, in consultation with them and their families and carers or guardian.
Local commissioners and providers of healthcare have a responsibility to enable the guideline to be applied when individual professionals and people using services wish to use it. They should do so in the context of local and national priorities for funding and developing services, and in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Technology appraisals

The recommendations in this interactive flowchart represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, health professionals are expected to take these recommendations fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients. The application of the recommendations in this interactive flowchart is at the discretion of health professionals and their individual patients and do not override the responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or their carer or guardian.
Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to provide the funding required to enable the recommendations to be applied when individual health professionals and their patients wish to use it, in accordance with the NHS Constitution. They should do so in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Medical technologies guidance, diagnostics guidance and interventional procedures guidance

The recommendations in this interactive flowchart represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, healthcare professionals are expected to take these recommendations fully into account. However, the interactive flowchart does not override the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or guardian or carer.
Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to implement the recommendations, in their local context, in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations. Nothing in this interactive flowchart should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with compliance with those duties.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Short Text

Everything NICE has said on babies, children and young people's experience of physical and mental healthcare in an interactive flowchart

What is covered

This pathway covers patient experience for babies, children and young people aged 17 or under who need physical or mental healthcare including how:
  • to make that experience as positive as possible
  • they can be involved in continuously improving that experience.

Sources

NICE guidance and other sources used to create this interactive flowchart.

Quality standards

Quality statements

Effective interventions library

Effective interventions library

Successful effective interventions library details

Implementation

NICE has produced resources to help implement its guidance on:

Information for the public

NICE has written information for the public on each of the following topics.

Pathway information

Person-centred care

People have the right to be involved in discussions and make informed decisions about their care, as described in your care.
Making decisions using NICE guidelines explains how we use words to show the strength (or certainty) of our recommendations, and has information about prescribing medicines (including off label use), professional guidelines, standards and laws (including on consent and mental capacity), and safeguarding.

Your responsibility

Guidelines

The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, professionals and practitioners are expected to take this guideline fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients or the people using their service. It is not mandatory to apply the recommendations, and the guideline does not override the responsibility to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual, in consultation with them and their families and carers or guardian.
Local commissioners and providers of healthcare have a responsibility to enable the guideline to be applied when individual professionals and people using services wish to use it. They should do so in the context of local and national priorities for funding and developing services, and in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Technology appraisals

The recommendations in this interactive flowchart represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, health professionals are expected to take these recommendations fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients. The application of the recommendations in this interactive flowchart is at the discretion of health professionals and their individual patients and do not override the responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or their carer or guardian.
Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to provide the funding required to enable the recommendations to be applied when individual health professionals and their patients wish to use it, in accordance with the NHS Constitution. They should do so in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Medical technologies guidance, diagnostics guidance and interventional procedures guidance

The recommendations in this interactive flowchart represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, healthcare professionals are expected to take these recommendations fully into account. However, the interactive flowchart does not override the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or guardian or carer.
Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to implement the recommendations, in their local context, in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations. Nothing in this interactive flowchart should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with compliance with those duties.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Supporting information

Something (for example, a service or information format) designed in a way so that people who have a disability or impairment are able to use it with a similar level of time, effort and skill needed as someone who does not.
Agreement given by a child or young person to a course of action or procedure, when they are not legally empowered to give consent.
When children, young people, parents or carers have had time to absorb and reflect on information they are given:
  • check they have understood it, and how it applies to them (see recommendation on checking understanding, above)
  • allow time to discuss the information again
  • actively encourage them to ask questions
  • make sure they know what to do if they do not understand, or have questions about their healthcare that come up later on.
Placing both hands firmly but gently on a baby and holding the position very still, to provide reassurance and comfort.
Knowledge, awareness and respect for other people's cultural background, identity and differences, without making assumptions about them.
Discuss consent, assent, privacy and confidentiality directly with children and young people if:
  • they are able to understand what these concepts mean (with appropriate explanation)
  • they can relate them to their own situation.
When discussing consent, assent, privacy and confidentiality:
  • ensure that children and young people, and parents or carers, understand their rights and responsibilities
  • explain when parents or carers might have to make decisions on behalf of children and young people.
For detailed advice on best practice around consent, privacy and confidentiality, refer to relevant professional guidance (for example, the General Medical Council ethical guidance for doctors on decision-making and consent and the 0-18 years: guidance for all doctors, the Nursing and Midwifery Council code) and the guidance on consent in the General Dental Council standards for the dental team).
Children under the age of 16 can consent to their own treatment if they're believed to have enough intelligence, competence and understanding to fully appreciate what's involved in their treatment. Also see the NHS website on consent to treatment - children and young people.
Not criticising or demonstrating a negative attitude about another person's feelings or actions, based on personal opinions or personal biases.
Parents or carers refers to the primary caregivers for a baby or child at any given time. This can include, birth or adoptive parents with parental responsibility, other members of the extended family who provide care such as siblings, grandparents, aunts and uncles, others nominated by the parents or legal guardians. For looked-after children or those who lack mental capacity it can also include those acting instead of parents such as a social worker, key worker, foster carers or guardians. It does not refer to nurses, healthcare assistants or other healthcare professionals who are acting in their professional capacity.
Human touch which aims to give babies the experience of touch that is not for a clinical purpose, but is given tenderly, lovingly and gently and that responds to and does not ignore their behaviour.
Activities that form part of a baby, child or young person's daily life and which may be disrupted by illness or the need to access healthcare services. This may include activities of daily living (bathing, showering, eating), interactions with family and friends, social and emotional development, education and schooling, sports, hobbies and interests, social activities and use of social media.

Glossary

Paths in this pathway

Pathway created: August 2021 Last updated: August 2021

© NICE 2021. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights.

Recently viewed