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People’s experience in adult social care services

About

What is covered

This interactive flowchart covers the care and support of adults, including people with learning disabilities, physical disabilities, sensory impairment and mental health or physical conditions. It applies to all settings where care is delivered, including people's own homes, and residential care and community settings. It also takes into account a range of inequalities that people may face.
NICE has also published recommendations on people's experience in adult NHS services and mental health services, and is developing recommendations on services and support specifically aimed at carers (publication expected July 2019).

Updates

Updates to this interactive flowchart

27 February 2019 People's experience using adult social care services (NICE quality standard 182) added.

Person-centred care

People have the right to be involved in discussions and make informed decisions about their care, as described in your care.
Making decisions using NICE guidelines explains how we use words to show the strength (or certainty) of our recommendations, and has information about prescribing medicines (including off label use), professional guidelines, standards and laws (including on consent and mental capacity), and safeguarding.

Your responsibility

Guidelines

The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, professionals and practitioners are expected to take this guideline fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients or the people using their service. It is not mandatory to apply the recommendations, and the guideline does not override the responsibility to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual, in consultation with them and their families and carers or guardian.
Local commissioners and providers of healthcare have a responsibility to enable the guideline to be applied when individual professionals and people using services wish to use it. They should do so in the context of local and national priorities for funding and developing services, and in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Technology appraisals

The recommendations in this interactive flowchart represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, health professionals are expected to take these recommendations fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients. The application of the recommendations in this interactive flowchart is at the discretion of health professionals and their individual patients and do not override the responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or their carer or guardian.
Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to provide the funding required to enable the recommendations to be applied when individual health professionals and their patients wish to use it, in accordance with the NHS Constitution. They should do so in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Medical technologies guidance, diagnostics guidance and interventional procedures guidance

The recommendations in this interactive flowchart represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, healthcare professionals are expected to take these recommendations fully into account. However, the interactive flowchart does not override the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or guardian or carer.
Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to implement the recommendations, in their local context, in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations. Nothing in this interactive flowchart should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with compliance with those duties.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Short Text

Everything NICE has said on improving people's experience of care in adult social care services in an interactive flowchart

What is covered

This interactive flowchart covers the care and support of adults, including people with learning disabilities, physical disabilities, sensory impairment and mental health or physical conditions. It applies to all settings where care is delivered, including people's own homes, and residential care and community settings. It also takes into account a range of inequalities that people may face.
NICE has also published recommendations on people's experience in adult NHS services and mental health services, and is developing recommendations on services and support specifically aimed at carers (publication expected July 2019).

Updates

Updates to this interactive flowchart

27 February 2019 People's experience using adult social care services (NICE quality standard 182) added.

Sources

NICE guidance and other sources used to create this interactive flowchart.

Quality standards

People's experience using adult social care services

These quality statements are taken from the people's experience using adult social care services quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for people's experience using adult social care services and should be read in full.

Quality statements

Care and support needs assessment

This quality statement is taken from the people’s experience using adult social care services quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for people’s experience using adult social care services and should be read in full.

Quality statement

People’s personal strengths, preferences, aspirations and needs are discussed when they have a care and support needs assessment.

Rationale

A care and support needs assessment that focuses on the person’s strengths, preferences, aspirations and needs helps people to highlight the outcomes that are important to them. During the assessment, the person can identify how their needs impact on their wellbeing and ability to live an independent life, as well as on their goals and preferred outcomes. This ensures that they have autonomy in deciding what is important to them. They can then agree a care and support plan that supports them to achieve their goals and outcomes, with agreed timescales to review the plan to ensure it is still suitable for their needs. This is particularly important for people whose condition means that their needs can fluctuate.

Quality measures

Structure
a) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that care and support needs assessments include documented discussion with the person on their strengths, preferences, aspirations and needs.
Data source: Local data collection, for example staff training records and care and support needs assessments protocols.
b) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that people who have substantial difficulty with involvement and no appropriate individual to support them, as defined by the Care Act 2014, have enough time with an independent advocate before the care and support needs assessment takes place so that they can prepare for it.
Data source: Local data collection, for example records of independent advocacy use and surveys on the experience of people who have had a care and support needs assessment.
Process
a) Proportion of care and support needs assessments where a discussion and agreement of the person’s strengths, preferences, aspirations and needs is documented.
Numerator – the number in the denominator where a discussion and agreement of the person’s strengths, preferences, aspirations and needs is documented.
Denominator – the number of care and support needs assessments.
Data source: Local data collection, for example care and support needs assessment records and surveys on the experience of people who have had a care and support needs assessment.
b) Proportion of care and support needs assessments where people who have substantial difficulty with involvement and no appropriate individual to support them, as defined by the Care Act 2014, have access to an independent advocate.
Numerator – the number in the denominator where people have access to an independent advocate.
Denominator – the number of care and support needs assessments where people have substantial difficulty with involvement and no appropriate individual to support them, as defined by the Care Act 2014.
Data source: Local data collection, for example care and support needs assessment records, independent advocacy records and surveys on the experience of people who have had a care and support needs assessment.
Outcome
a) Satisfaction of people with the extent to which the care and support needs assessment promoted their interests and independence.
Data source: Local data collection, for example surveys on the experience of people who have had a care and support needs assessment.
b) Satisfaction of people using adult social care services with the support they receive to achieve their self-defined outcomes.
Data source: Local data collection, for example audits of care and support needs assessment records and surveys on the experience of people who have had a care and support needs assessment.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Social care practitioners (such as social workers and occupational therapists) who are carrying out care and support needs assessments focus the assessment on the person’s strengths, preferences, aspirations and needs, agreeing these with the person, to identify the outcomes that are important to them. They find out what people want from their day-to-day life and their long-term goals and have a good understanding of all the services available that can help them achieve this.
Commissioners (local authorities) ensure that they commission services that focus care and support needs assessments on the person’s strengths, preferences, aspirations and needs. Their services ensure that the care and support needs assessment focuses on the person’s strengths, preferences, aspirations and needs, and how these impact on their wellbeing. They ensure that the practitioners carrying out the assessments have been trained to make the assessment person centred. If people having the assessment would like an independent advocate, or they would benefit from having one, arrangements are made to ensure they are present and have had time to talk to the person about the assessment before it takes place.
People having a care and support needs assessment are involved fully in the assessment, with an independent advocate if they need one, based on the Care Act 2014. This gives them the opportunity to explain and agree their personal strengths, preferences and needs, what they would like to be able to achieve in their day-to-day life, and their long-term goals.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Care and support needs assessment
The aim of the care and support needs assessment is to understand the person's needs and goals. After carrying out the assessment, the local authority should consider whether any of the needs identified are eligible for support.
The assessment:
  • focuses on the person’s needs and how they impact on their wellbeing
  • focuses on the outcomes they want to achieve in their day-to-day life
  • involves the person and, if they want, their carers in discussions and decisions about their care and support
  • takes into account the person's personal history and life story
  • takes a whole-family approach
  • takes into account the needs of carers
  • takes into account the person's housing status, and where and who they want to live with
  • is aimed at promoting their interests and independence
  • is respectful of their dignity
  • is transparent in terms of letting people and their families and carers know how, when and why decisions are made
  • takes into account the potential negative effect of social isolation on people's health and wellbeing.
[Adapted from NICE’s guideline on people's experience in adult social care services, terms used in this guideline and recommendations 1.3.3 and 1.3.4]

Equality and diversity considerations

People who are having a care and support needs assessment may have several needs, for example help with communication. Services should ensure that people have the help they need, for example through an independent advocate or communication aid, to participate fully in the assessment.
People should be provided with information about the care and support needs assessment that they can easily read and understand themselves, or with support, so they can communicate effectively with social care services about the assessment and understand the outcome of the assessment. Information should be in a format that suits their needs and preferences, for example Braille. It should be accessible to people who do not speak or read English, and it should be culturally and age appropriate. People should have access to an interpreter or independent advocate if needed.
For people with additional needs related to a disability, impairment or sensory loss, information should be provided as set out in NHS England's Accessible Information Standard.
People aged 18–24 who are in transition between children’s and adult services may still be cared for under children’s services. The assessment should take account of this and ensure there is continuity in their care during the transition process.
Assessors should be confident discussing and assessing the specific needs of people of all sexual orientations, taking this into account when planning people’s subsequent care.

Empowering people to manage their personal budget

This quality statement is taken from the people’s experience using adult social care services quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for people’s experience using adult social care services and should be read in full.

Quality statement

People using adult social care services have as much control as they would like over their personal budget.

Rationale

Giving people who have a personal budget for social care services, funded by the local council, control over their budget allows them to exercise influence over how their care and support is provided. It can enhance the person’s quality of life by allowing them to choose the services they believe they would benefit from. They are then more likely to engage with services and participate fully with them, which means they can achieve the outcomes identified as important to them.

Quality measures

Structure
a) Evidence of local arrangements to inform people who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council and who are using adult social care services that they have the option to control their budget to buy the services that are important to them.
Data source: Local data collection, such as audits of care and needs support assessments and care and support plans.
b) Evidence of local arrangements to inform people who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council and who are using adult social care services of the different options for managing their budget.
Data source: Local data collection, for example audits of care and needs support assessments and care and support plans.
c) Evidence of local arrangements for providing accessible information on personal budgets and peer support on using them.
Data source: Local data collection, for example information services, audits of the availability of peer support such as user-led centres for independent living, and surveys on the experience of people using adult social care services.
Process
Proportion of people using adult social care services who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council and whose views were included when their support was planned.
Numerator – the number in the denominator whose views were included during support planning.
Denominator – the number of people using adult social care services who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council.
Data source: The Personal Outcomes Evaluation Tool for adults in receipt of social care support includes a question on whether people’s views were included when their support was planned.
Outcome
Satisfaction of people using adult social care services who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council with the help they receive to use their budget to choose the support that is the most important to them.
Data source: The Personal Outcomes Evaluation Tool for adults in receipt of social care support includes a question on the choice and control that people using adult social care services have on how their personal budget is spent. Local data collection such as surveys on the experience of people using adult social care services can also be used.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (such as peer-support services including centres for independent living) ensure that systems are in place to advise people who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council how they can use their budget and that support is available to help people manage this. This advice and support should cover the different ways that the personal budget from local authorities can be provided.
Social care practitioners (such as social workers and occupational therapists) are aware of the options for people who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council to use their budget for social care services. They explain to people using adult social care services the options for using the budget and the different types of support they can access to help them with this. This will give people the opportunity to consider how they wish to spend their budget and how they would like it to be held.
Commissioners (local authorities) ensure that they commission services and supply funding to voluntary and peer services that allow and support people who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council to manage it. They ensure that systems are in place to advise people who have such a budget how they can use it and that support is available to help them manage this. This advice and support should cover the different ways that the personal budget can be provided.
People using adult social care services who have a personal budget for social care services funded by the local council are able to influence and exercise control over how their budget is managed. They receive information on the different ways their personal budget can be managed and the different options they have to use it. They can choose how they would like to receive their personal budget and how they would like to use it to pay for their social care. They have support to help them make these decisions if they wish.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Personal budget
Money that is allocated by the local council to pay for care or support to meet a person’s assessed needs. People can take their personal budget as a direct payment, or choose to let the council arrange services (sometimes known as a managed budget) or a combination of the two. An alternative is an individual service fund, which is a personal budget that a care provider manages on the person’s behalf.
[Adapted from Think Local, Act Personal's care and support jargon buster and expert opinion]

Equality and diversity considerations

People using adult social care services may have several needs, for example help with communication. Services should ensure that people have the help they need, for example through an independent advocate or communication aid, to understand the different options for using their personal budget and supported to manage this as far as is possible.
People should be provided with information about the options they have to control and use their personal budget that they can easily read and understand themselves, or with support, so they can communicate effectively with social care services about this. Information should be in a format that suits their needs and preferences, for example Braille. It should accessible to people who do not speak or read English, and it should be culturally and age appropriate. People should have access to an interpreter or independent advocate if needed.
For people with additional needs related to a disability, impairment or sensory loss, information should be provided as set out in NHS England's Accessible Information Standard.
People in the travelling community might not be resident in the same area for a long period of time. Practitioners should consider how to support people from the travelling community to manage their personal budget when they move to another area.

Continuity of care and support

This quality statement is taken from the people’s experience using adult social care services quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for people’s experience using adult social care services and should be read in full.

Quality statement

People using adult social care services have continuity of care and support.

Rationale

If care workers know the person, their preferences, and their care and support needs, it helps to ensure continuity of care. Having continuity of care and support has a considerable impact on a person’s wellbeing and quality of life, as it can lead to them forming positive relationships with their care workers. All of this will help the person achieve the outcomes they identified as important to them in the care and support needs assessment. This can include taking part in activities or being able to reduce or stop using adult social care services if their condition means they do not need care and support on a long-term basis.

Quality measures

Structure
a) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure that services are available to provide continuity of care and support for people using adult social care services.
Data source: Local data collection, for example service specifications and plans for service provision.
b) Evidence of local arrangements to ensure a consistent team of care workers for people using adult social care services.
Data source: Local data collection, for example local care protocols on the organisation of care workers providing care and support.
Process
Total number of care workers providing care to a person using adult social care services.
Data source: Local data collection, for example audits of care records, including names of care workers.
Outcome
a) Satisfaction of people using adult social care services with the continuity of their care and support.
Data source: Local data collection such as surveys on the experience of people using adult social care services.
b) Quality of life of people using adult social care services.
Data source: The Personal Outcomes Evaluation Tool for adults in receipt of social care support includes a question on the impact of people’s support on their quality of life and local data collection such as surveys on the experience of people using adult social care services.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (such as independent home care agencies, residential care services and voluntary sector organisations) ensure that people using adult social care services experience care and support from a consistent team of social care workers who are familiar with their needs. People using these services should always be told in advance if new staff will be providing their care. The types of service being provided should be consistent and not withdrawn without reasonable notice and alternative arrangements being made.
Social care practitioners (such as home care workers and personal assistants) ensure that they get to know the preferences of the people they care for, including asking them how they like to receive their care and providing it in line with this. They ensure they make detailed notes when they provide care and support so that other members of the team can care for the person in a similar way.
Commissioners (local authorities) commission services that ensure that people using adult social care services experience continuity in their care and support, including seeing a consistent team of care workers who are familiar with their needs. They also ensure that the types of service being provided are consistent and not withdrawn without reasonable notice and alternative arrangements being made.
People using adult social care services have the same team of care workers who are familiar with their needs and preferences. People are told in advance if new staff will be involved in their care and support. The staff caring for them record details of the person’s preferences and the care they have had so that other members of the team can make sure they care for them in a similar way.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

Continuity of care and support
This includes ensuring that:
  • all practitioners involved with the person's care and support are familiar with how that person likes support to be given
  • where possible, the same people support the person
  • if the same staff are not available, there are good handover arrangements
  • all staff supporting the person have similar levels of skills and competency.
[Adapted from NICE’s guideline on people’s experience in adult social care services, recommendation 1.4.7]

Equality and diversity considerations

People using adult social care services may have several needs, for example help with communication. The staff they are in contact with should be aware of this and know how the person prefers to be cared for.
For people with additional needs related to a disability, impairment or sensory loss, information should be provided as set out in NHS England's Accessible Information Standard.
People aged 18–24 who are in transition between children’s and adult services may still be cared for under children’s services. During this transition period it is important that services provide care that is continuous and consistent.
People in the travelling community may not be resident in an area for a long period of time, therefore practitioners should ensure that transition and handover arrangements are put in place when they move to another area.

Using people’s views to improve services

This quality statement is taken from the people’s experience using adult social care services quality standard. The quality standard defines clinical best practice for people’s experience using adult social care services and should be read in full.

Quality statement

People using adult social care services have their views used to inform service improvement.

Rationale

Involving people in service improvement by obtaining and acting on feedback about their experience and how they would like the service to operate means that services can be more responsive to the people using them and adapt to their needs. It can help identify barriers to accessing services and ensure that more people can use them.

Quality measures

Structure
a) Evidence of local arrangements to ask for feedback from people using adult social care services to inform service improvement.
Data source: Local data collection, for example records of individual and group meetings, surveys and comment forms.
b) Evidence of local arrangements to implement the single complaints statement and encourage people using adult social care services to use it.
Data source: Local data collection, for example policies and initiatives on the single complaints statement and strategies for public involvement.
c) Evidence of local arrangements for supporting people using adult social care services to provide feedback on their experience using services.
Data source: Local data collection, for example records of independent advocacy use.
d) Evidence of local arrangements for people who have provided feedback on adult social care services to be informed of improvements made as a result of their input.
Data source: Local data collection, for example records of meetings with people using services, and posters and leaflets explaining changes made as a result of feedback from people using services.
Process
Proportion of people using adult social care services who are asked to provide their opinion of a service.
Numerator – the number in the denominator who are asked to provide their opinion of a service.
Denominator – the number of people using adult social care services.
Data source: Local data collection, for example engagement records.
Outcome
a) Improvements to adult social care services which are informed by feedback from people using services.
Data source: Local data collection, for example surveys of people using services.
b) Satisfaction of people using adult social care services with the way their feedback has been used.
Data source: Local data collection, for example surveys of people using services.

What the quality statement means for different audiences

Service providers (such as managers and owners of adult social care services and voluntary sector organisations) ensure that people using services are encouraged to voice their opinions and that their opinions are actively sought, for example through drop-in sessions and comment cards. Engagement and feedback from people using services is included in published reports, such as the annual report. Service providers give regular updates on ways that feedback from people using services has been considered and used to improve services, for example through group meetings, leaflets and posters.
Social care practitioners ensure that they support people using services to give feedback on services and that people feel safe to give such feedback. They can help to arrange independent advocacy if a person feels this would help them to express their views.
Commissioners (local authorities) ensure that they commission adult social care services that ask for feedback from people using the services to make improvements and report on how they have fed this back.
People using adult social care services have the opportunity to voice their opinions and these are taken into account when changes are being made to services. People receive feedback on how their opinions have influenced the changes and redesign of the services they use.

Source guidance

Definitions of terms used in this quality statement

People’s views
The feedback provided by people using services, and their carers. This includes qualitative and quantitative data and can include:
  • the lived experiences of people who use services
  • information from voluntary organisations that represent people who use social care services, for example Healthwatch
  • existing sources of information, such as complaints
  • surveys and questionnaires of people using services and their carers
  • information gathered through focus groups and meetings with people using services.
Different approaches to obtaining feedback and involving people who use services, and their carers, to improve services will be needed for different services. Agreement on how this will be done on a regular basis (for example annually) and before a significant change in a service or the development of a new one, can help ensure that improvements to services are made at the most suitable time.
[Adapted from NICE’s guideline on people’s experience in adult social care services, recommendation 1.6.4 and expert opinion]
Used to inform service improvement
This feedback is used to inform decisions about the way services are commissioned, run and governed and to check that services are delivering quality care and support. It can also be used when new services are being designed and to adapt existing services to be more responsive to the people using them.
[Adapted from NICE’s guideline on people’s experience in adult social care services, recommendation 1.6.1 and expert opinion]

Equality and diversity considerations

People using adult social care services may have several needs, for example help with communication. Services should ensure that people have the help they need, for example through an independent advocate or communication aid, to provide their feedback.
People should be provided with information that they can easily read and understand themselves, or with support, so that they can communicate effectively with health and social care services when providing feedback on services. The information should be in a format that suits their needs and preferences, for example Braille. It should be accessible to people who do not speak or read English, and it should be culturally and age appropriate. People should have access to an interpreter or independent advocate if needed.
For people with additional needs related to a disability, impairment or sensory loss, information should be provided as set out in NHS England's Accessible Information Standard.

Effective interventions library

Effective interventions library

Successful effective interventions library details

Implementation

NICE has produced resources to help implement its guidance on:
Definitions used in this interactive flowchart are from the Think Local, Act Personal Care and Support Jargon Buster. Visit this site for other social care terms.

Information for the public

NICE has written information for the public on each of the following topics.

Pathway information

Person-centred care

People have the right to be involved in discussions and make informed decisions about their care, as described in your care.
Making decisions using NICE guidelines explains how we use words to show the strength (or certainty) of our recommendations, and has information about prescribing medicines (including off label use), professional guidelines, standards and laws (including on consent and mental capacity), and safeguarding.

Your responsibility

Guidelines

The recommendations in this guideline represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, professionals and practitioners are expected to take this guideline fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients or the people using their service. It is not mandatory to apply the recommendations, and the guideline does not override the responsibility to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual, in consultation with them and their families and carers or guardian.
Local commissioners and providers of healthcare have a responsibility to enable the guideline to be applied when individual professionals and people using services wish to use it. They should do so in the context of local and national priorities for funding and developing services, and in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities. Nothing in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Technology appraisals

The recommendations in this interactive flowchart represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, health professionals are expected to take these recommendations fully into account, alongside the individual needs, preferences and values of their patients. The application of the recommendations in this interactive flowchart is at the discretion of health professionals and their individual patients and do not override the responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or their carer or guardian.
Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to provide the funding required to enable the recommendations to be applied when individual health professionals and their patients wish to use it, in accordance with the NHS Constitution. They should do so in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, to advance equality of opportunity and to reduce health inequalities.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Medical technologies guidance, diagnostics guidance and interventional procedures guidance

The recommendations in this interactive flowchart represent the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, healthcare professionals are expected to take these recommendations fully into account. However, the interactive flowchart does not override the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make decisions appropriate to the circumstances of the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and/or guardian or carer.
Commissioners and/or providers have a responsibility to implement the recommendations, in their local context, in light of their duties to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations. Nothing in this interactive flowchart should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with compliance with those duties.
Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible.

Supporting information

When a person who uses services is involved as an equal partner in designing the support and services they receive. Co-production recognises that people who use social care services (and their families) have knowledge and experience that can be used to help make services better, not only for themselves but for other people who need social care. Wherever possible and appropriate, families and carers should be involved in co-production, in an effective way, with the consent of the person who uses services.
The Think Local Act Personal (TLAP) 6 principles of co-production are:
  • recognising people as assets
  • building on people's capabilities
  • developing 2-way, reciprocal relationships
  • encouraging peer support
  • blurring boundaries between delivering and receiving services
  • facilitating rather than delivering.
When a person who uses services is involved as an equal partner in designing the support and services they receive. Co-production recognises that people who use social care services (and their families) have knowledge and experience that can be used to help make services better, not only for themselves but for other people who need social care. Wherever possible and appropriate, families and carers should be involved in co-production, in an effective way, with the consent of the person who uses services.
The Think Local Act Personal (TLAP) 6 principles of co-production are:
  • recognising people as assets
  • building on people's capabilities
  • developing 2-way, reciprocal relationships
  • encouraging peer support
  • blurring boundaries between delivering and receiving services
  • facilitating rather than delivering.
As part of care planning, consider identifying a named coordinator who is competent to:
  • act as the first point of contact for any questions or problems
  • contribute to the assessment process
  • liaise and work with the person, their families, carers and advocates
  • liaise and work with all health, social care and housing services involved with the person, including those provided by the voluntary and community sector
  • ensure that any referrals needed are made and are actioned.
Local authorities should ensure that the person's care and support plan includes clear information about what involvement from others (carers, family and friends) they want in their care and support, in line with the Care Act 2014.

Glossary

(under the Care Act 2014, local authorities must carry out an assessment of anyone who appears to require care and support – the aim of assessment is to understand the person's needs and goals; after carrying out the assessment, the local authority consider whether any of the needs identified are eligible for support)
(a written plan after a person has had an assessment, setting out what their care and support needs are, how they will be met [including what they or anyone who cares for them will do] and what services they will receive; the person should have the opportunity to be fully involved in their plan and to say what their own priorities are)
(a care and support plan is a plan written after a person has had an assessment, setting out what their care and support needs are, how they will be met [including what they or anyone who cares for them will do] and what services they will receive; the person should have the opportunity to be fully involved in their plan and to say what their own priorities are)
a person who provides unpaid support to a partner, family member, friend or neighbour who is ill, struggling or disabled and could not manage without this help – this is distinct from a care worker, who is paid to support people
people who provide unpaid support to a partner, family member, friend or neighbour who is ill, struggling or disabled and could not manage without this help – this is distinct from care workers, who are paid to support people

Paths in this pathway

Pathway created: February 2018 Last updated: February 2019

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